The hot coffee glossary: How to brew up all those cool caffeine cuppas right at home

Ever since my last blog post on coffee, I’ve been inundated with questions on how to distinguish the different kinds of cuppas out there. And how to recreate them right at home. Because if coffee comes loaded with so many health and beauty benefits, we should be exploring multiple ways to enjoy it!

And no, it’s not in the least bit difficult to make a fancy-sounding (and tasting) marochino. Or a demi-cremé. Or a Café Viennois.

These super-easy recipes – and a good base, which I brew up with coffee capsules of Gourmesso – should equip you with all the knowledge your caffeine-seeking brain could ever need to know. Play around with your new vocabulary and see a whole new world of caffeine opening up for you!

hot-coffee-typesEspresso

Espresso is a concentrated 1 oz shot of coffee made with 7 grams of finely ground coffee extracted at high pressure. Having it “short” means that it has less water and is therefore more concentrated, and “long” conversely uses more water and does not taste as strong. Purists have it without milk, though you can add a bit of sugar!

Americano

An Americano is a single shot of espresso diluted to taste with hot water. The name was a dig at Americans, who couldn’t handle an actual espresso.

Ristretto

‘Ristretto’ means ‘restricted’ – to make a shot, water is forced through ground coffee just like espresso but more quickly. There’s less caffeine compared to regular espresso but the same amount of coffee oils and flavour.

Doppio

A double shot of espresso, extracted using a double coffee filter. This results in 2 oz (60 ml) of drink, double the amount of an espresso.

coffee-morningRed Eye

The red eye is a shot of espresso mixed with drip coffee.

Macchiato

A macchiato is an espresso “stained” with a little bit of foam and usually drizzled with caramel sauce. Often, vanilla is added to provide extra flavor.

Con Panna

Another bitter espresso that is topped with a small amount of sweet whipped cream.

Cappuccino

A true cappuccino is equal parts espresso, steamed milk and milk froth. If frothed correctly, these are not supposed to distinct layers but rather a smooth, silky blending of each elements.

Dry Cappuccino

A regular cappuccino but with very little warm milk and more foam or froth.

Flat white

Developed in Australia, flat white is made by pouring steamed milk from the bottom of a pitcher, aka “microfoam,” over ristretto.

Irish coffee

This classic drink is made from hot coffee, Irish whiskey, and sugar topped with thick cream.

Cafe latte

A caffe latte is a single shot of espresso to three parts of steamed milk with a small amount of froth on top.

Demi-cremé

Espresso topped with half-and-half or skimmed milk.

Cafe au lait

A weaker form of caffe latte made with brewed coffee instead of espresso, with an equal milk to coffee in the ratio of 1:1.

Cafe mocha (Mochachino)

This is a cappuccino or a caffe latte with chocolate syrup or powder added. You could garnish with some whipped cream.

Marochino

A shot of espresso, cocoa powder and milk froth; thick hot cocoa optional.

Café Viennois / Vienna coffee

A classic in the cafés of Budapest and Vienna, the viennois is made of espresso, hot milk, and whipped cream.

Cuban coffee

Cuban coffee is a type of espresso, which is sweetened with natural brown sugar as it is being brewed.

Cortado

‘Cortado’ is Spanish for ‘to cut’ – and this drink is a shot of espresso cut with approximately the same amount of steamed milk.

Caffè corretto

The corretto is an Italian cocktail of espresso, grappa, and sambuca or brandy.

Café con leche

A Spanish beverage consisting of strong or bold coffee (usually espresso) mixed with scalded milk in a 1:1 ratio.

Long black

Another Aussie creation, a long black is made by pouring a double shot of espresso over hot water that’s been heated by the espresso machine.

What’s your favourite coffee? Discovered anything new and interesting lately?

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